Iowa Radiology Blog

MRI and Ultrasound for Breast Imaging

Jun 22, 2020 12:39:27 PM

Posted by Iowa Radiology

Mammography is the most widely used and commonly recommended technology for breast imaging. The American College of Radiology and the Society for Breast Imaging recommend annual mammography screening for women at average risk of breast cancer beginning at age 40. In some instances, however, MRI or ultrasound imaging is recommended as a supplement to mammography.

Why are other imaging methods recommended?

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Topics: women's ultrasound, breast MRI

What You Should Know about Breast Density and Cancer Screening

Jan 27, 2020 11:15:00 AM

Posted by Iowa Radiology

Since 2017, Iowa law has required mammography providers to include information about breast density in mammography reports. You may have questions about what this information means for you, your health, and the effectiveness of your breast cancer screening.

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Topics: breast MRI, mammography

What Options Are Available for Breast Cancer Screening?

Jan 13, 2020 8:30:00 AM

Posted by Iowa Radiology

Approximately one in eight women (12.5%) develops breast cancer in her lifetime. Because of the prevalence of breast cancer in women, doctors and medical associations recommend screening—looking for signs of disease when no symptoms are present. Mammography has been the gold standard of breast cancer detection for decades and remains a critical component of routine screening. Other technologies, however, can be valuable supplements—or in some cases, even replacements—for screening mammography.

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Topics: women's ultrasound, breast MRI, mammography

What Should I Know About Abbreviated Breast MRI?

Sep 23, 2019 8:15:00 AM

Posted by Diane Campbell

Abbreviated breast MRI is a new enhanced breast cancer screening option for women with dense breast tissue and less than a 20% lifetime risk of breast cancer.

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Topics: breast MRI

Modern Breast Cancer Screening

Jul 29, 2019 8:33:00 AM

Posted by Diane Campbell

Dating back to the 1970s, the use of mammography in breast cancer screening has proven to save lives. Breast cancer screening has evolved dramatically, however, since those early days of direct-exposure film and the need for high radiation doses. Refinements in technique and technology have enabled doctors to successfully detect and treat more cancers at earlier stages, using less radiation than in the past.[1] Today, radiologists have multiple effective tools available for identifying breast cancers as early as possible to give patients the best chance of recovery.

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Topics: women's ultrasound, breast MRI, mammography

Alternatives and Supplements to Mammography Part 2—Breast MRI

Sep 1, 2018 8:45:00 AM

Posted by Diane Campbell

mriWhile mammography is the only breast cancer screening tool proven to reduce deaths through early detection, other methods of imaging are useful when mammography alone doesn’t provide the information needed. MRI is a valuable modality for getting a closer look at confirmed or suspected breast cancer as well as providing additional protection for women at high risk.

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Topics: breast MRI

Mammogram, Breast Ultrasound, & Breast MRI—What’s the Difference?

Jun 29, 2017 4:14:00 PM

Posted by Diane Campbell

Mammography is the standard for breast cancer screening, but it’s not the only imaging method that doctors use to get information about breast conditions and possible cancers. In some cases, ultrasound or MRI are chosen to supplement or replace mammography as a breast imaging tool. To help you understand why your doctor may recommend a particular breast imaging procedure, here are some basic reasons that each is often used.

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Topics: women's ultrasound, breast MRI, mammography

When And Why To Have A Breast MRI

Sep 5, 2014 3:59:46 PM

Posted by Diane Campbell

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be used in addition to mammography to produce detailed images of the breast. Breast MRI is commonly used after a biopsy that indicates the presence of breast cancer, but it may also be used as a screening tool in certain individuals.[1]

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Topics: cancer, breast MRI

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